Tuesday, May 23, 2017

It ain't all moo-cows and mansions





Mostly, sure.

But there are other things too.

The little calf who can't get up continues to hold her own. When I finished giving her her bottle this morning she tried really hard to get up and have some more, which is a good sign. She seems to be a bit stronger and a bit more coordinated today, but that might just be wishful thinking on my part. We'll keep on keepin' on.

The other calves were enjoying breakfast in the pasture this morning. They like salads and milkshakes.





Work on the plan for the mansion continues apace. I'm reliably informed that I am acting as my own general contractor, which is allegedly a deucedly hard job. Should save myself some coin in the end, and I expect to see a large kickback!

Now then, on with the show.

There was a Twin Bonanza on the ramp at Joint Base Kimball/NAS PrairieAdventure this morning.


I've always been a sucker for the Beech 50, particularly the B50. They just do it for me.


This one came off the line at Wichita in March, 1954.


It's a very pretty airplane and seems to be well used and well cared for.


It's a big airplane for a light twin, sits tall on trike undercarriage and weighs in at 4,000 lbs empty and 6,500 gross.



It's powered by a pair of Lycoming GO-435 air cooled, horizontally opposed six bangers making about 240 hp a side and driving three-bladed Hartzell props.




Not a speed demon, doesn't carry a huge load, fairly short legs, but a robust and reliable steed.



Now what's that makeup mirror for?


Yeah, that one.


Oh yeah...


Have a great Beechcraft day!

15 comments:

  1. Mirror allows for undercarriage check.

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    1. Couldn't get a left seat perspective pic of the nose gear so I did the best I could... :)

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  2. Thanks for the post and pictures. Always nice to see aircraft, no matter what kind. And, what? being able to carry more than half the aircraft's weight in cargo is not " a huge load "? It seems to me that for a non-cargo aircraft that is substantial. But what do I know, I only played with the heavies.

    Paul L. Quandt

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    1. Well, it's a good load for some values of good load. Fill the seats and the tanks though and you'll have to leave your golf sticks at the FBO.

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    2. Ok, shows how little I know about light aircraft.

      Paul

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  3. Heh, there's always room for a pallet of golf clubs on a Starlifter. 😁

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    Replies
    1. To channel OAFS: heh.

      PLQ

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  4. Nice aircraft. I like the vertical stab, beefy looking and substantial, like it means business.

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    1. I agree. In the first demonstration flight for the Army (the Twin Bonanza became the L-23) they rolled it up in a ball with six souls on board trying to show off a short field landing over a 50' tree hedge. All six walked away. IIRC the plane was repaired and is still flying today.

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  5. What have I done to bring down the Stassi (?) on me? Both here and at the Chant. Making me right paranoid, it is.

    Paul L. Quandt

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    Replies
    1. What Sarge said. As near as I can tell I don't have any restrictions at all for comments. That said, I don't really understand how this magic stuff works.

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  6. "...I don't really understand how this magic stuff works. I don't really understand how this magic stuff works."

    Really, haven't you read the books? You just wave your wand, say the proper word(s), and presto, there you have it. Err, something like that.

    Paul

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    Replies
    1. That was strange, I used copy and paste, not at all sure how your line got doubled. More of that magic stuff, I guess.

      PLQ

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  7. Now THAT is a pretty airplane! Painted in UW red and white, too!

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