Friday, July 21, 2017

Start 'em up and other wonders





Remember this airplane? Last July 31 I posted about it.


It's a North American T-28B Trojan, still dressed in the livery she wore in naval service with VT-27 at Corpus Christi.

The engine is (was last year anyway) a Lycoming-built R-1820-86 of 1,425 hp. Although a B model, the airplane is equipped with the shorter, C-model prop.

The Trojan is owned by Lee Griffin of North Pole, Alaska. A former USAF maintenance officer, Lee has quite a story.

Last year when Lee, his pilot, and his Trojan stopped by they were on their way home from Oshkosh. I didn't visit with them yesterday, but the timing indicates that they are on their way to the big air show, which starts Monday up in one of those mosquito-ridden northern states.

Anyway, yesterday as I drove out to check cattle and begin the day I espied the Trojan on the ramp and got there just in time for the engine start. What's better than that sound?



I visited with Dad and his little girl (with the taidragger in the video) for a few moments; they were out of Scottsbluff for nothing more than a morning VFR flyabout. How cool is that?

And now for the other wonder. In a month's time a monster will gobble up the sun. This is my only opportunity to witness a total here in God's Country. Unfortunately, we're south of the path of totality. We're scheduled for 95+ percent of total. Eighty miles up the road I can be right in the gut of darkness. Which is where I want to be. However, I'd also love to be on the ranch to experience and capture the experience at the home place. What to do?






17 comments:

  1. Nothing like the sound of a military piston engine. Nothing. Makes my heart sing it does.

    Eclipses, meh. While I was fascinated by them in the days of my youth, these days I find wonder in all things natural. An eclipse, while neat, doesn't quite fill me with awe like the feel of a boat under my feet, the wind in what's left of my hair, and the mournful cry of a seagull.

    But if it happened here, that would be cool. Would I travel to see one? Nope.

    But that's just me.

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    1. That sound is another proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy. :)

      No sea, sea boats, sea breeze, or sea birds here, so we're stuck with an ee-clips. Which in this instance is easier than traveling to the sea. :)

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    2. The sound of a R1820 would make me close my eyes, and think of Wildcats on the deck of a TAFFY THREE carrier.

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    3. Or a thousand B-17's starting up on a foggy morn in Blighty.

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  2. What better than an R-1820? Maybe an R-3350 but not much so.

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    1. Those twin-row radials are better sounding, but as you say, not by much.

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    2. Since my Uncle Darrell flew Hellcats, I like the sound of R-2800s best!

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  3. MB and I pretty much determined to make a long weekend and drive north almost to Portlandia to view as much of the eclipse as possible.
    We have discovered that it's going to be crowded up there, but then it's kinda crowded here.
    Maybe I will have some video, or at least pictures.

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    1. It's forecast to be crowded here, too. I know most of the county roads in the Panhandle, Hopefully I can find an uncrowded spot.

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    2. ( nny ) Uncle Skip:

      Come a little further west than the People's Republic of Portland, to Vernonia, OR and after we view the eclipse I'll treat you to a beverage of your choice.

      Paul L. Quandt

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  4. The eclispe is on my Birthday, Precious, but it will be over the horizon, here in a Northern State overrun with mosquitos, yes, Precious, so it will be yes, yes! By the by, a company in Mashfield, WI, was the only company that knew how to make plywood suitable for DeHavillands purposes, so Wisconsin is the source of all of those Mosquitos. They also proided the birch plywood for the Hughes Kaiser H-4 Hercules. All the wood involved came from Wood and Juneau Counties. I spent most of my life in Mauston, the County Seat of Juneau County. The Mosquitos and the H-4 explain why I never saw a big pine tree, nor a big birch tree when I was growing up!

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    1. Now I know where the Brits came up with the name! I still have scars from Wisquitoes!

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  5. Thanks for the T-28 video. No advice on the decision which you must make. I'm not going to see totality here, but chances are at least even that due to clouds, we will not see any of it. Oh well, I'm sure it will be on the tube and net.

    Paul

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    1. That'a good point about the availability of pozt-eclipse images. Be just my luck to get rained/clouded out here. ElNino is forecast to send us preip in August and September.

      You're welcome on the vid. Cool to be able to share.

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    2. Other than missing the eclipse, I don't suppose that you'll be upset about rain in August and September, will you. Or will it mess up something you are growing or harvesting?

      PLQ

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